Brandon Schraml

Brandon Schraml

Brandon Schraml hails from the city with the second most fountains in the world, has performed in 48 of the 50 states and would visit Mars if he could! Learn more about our Polar Bear/Puppeteer from Please Bring Balloons!

Meet Claire Simba

Claire Simba writes and directs her own plays, wants to travel to Greece to see where Theatre was born and has lived across three continents! Learn more about Claire, our Emma in Please Bring Balloons!

Derek Christopher Murphy of Love That Dog

Derek Christopher Murphy

Love That Dog’s Derek Christopher Murphy was a state champion pole vaulter, says Count Olaf is one of the best villains of all time and has his own dog named Prince! Learn more about the man bringing Jack to life in Love That Dog!

What’s Your Favorite Holiday Tradition?

The holidays are here! There’s nothing better than spending time with the ones we love at the most wonderful time of the year! We asked the cast and creative team of our holiday productions what there favorite holiday traditions were – see what they said below!

My favorite holiday tradition is…

“Decorating the tree and eating a giant tin of popcorn while listening to Ella Fitzgerald’s Christmas album.” – Evan Zavada, Young Charles Dickens Music Director

“Trick or treating and dressing up for Halloween! Of course! I would say: My favorite new holiday tradition is taking the family to see the tree in Rockefeller Center!” – Costume Designer Leslie Bernstein

“Listening to Christmas Music on the radio. All. Season. Long.” – Josh Penzell, Original Director of Young Charles Dickens  

“My partner and I buy a new Christmas ornament every year with all of our family members name on it” – Amaker Smith, Ballerina Swan and the Nutcracker cast member

“Helping my mom hang her hundreds of ornaments on the Christmas tree and then enjoying raspberry crepes with my family on Christmas morning.” – Elaine Cotter, Young Charles Dickens cast member

“Visiting Santa with my family on Christmas Eve for our annual Christmas photo, followed by making (and eating!) gingerbread houses with my sisters and cousins!” – Abbey Ashley, Ballerina Swan and the Nutcracker cast member

“Getting to spend time with my family, and seeing everyone open their presents! Also, I have to say – my mom’s Oatmeal Lace Cookies are definitely one of my favorite holiday traditions!” – Kate Mincer, Costume Designer

“Just being home for the holidays!” – Nina Paradiz, Wardrobe Supervisor

“Having jelly donuts with my family on the first night of Chanukah.” – Gabrielle Weinstein, Young Charles Dickens Stage Manager

“HOMEMADE CHOCOLATE PIE.” – Raife Baker, Dialect Coach

“Partaking in the holiday feast with my family. There is nothing better than good food and family!” – Cameron Mullin, Young Charles Dickens cast member

“Ordering from Dewey’s bakery to eat on Christmas Mornin'” – Nick Sacks, Young Charles Dickens cast member

“Watching It’s A Wonderful Life while drinking eggnog (with nutmeg sprinkled on top!) and wrapping packages.” – Valerie Guido, Ballerina Swan and the Nutcracker cast member

“The HUGE Christmas dinner my family does on Christmas Eve. It’s always full of joy and laughter and I look forward to it every year!” – Kyle Huey, Young Charles Dickens cast member

“Decorating the house and Christmas tree with holiday music playing.” – Jeff Davis, Ballerina Swan and the Nutcracker cast member

“Sharing delicious food with friends and family.” – Emily Vetsch, Ballerina Swan and the Nutcracker cast member

“Obviously the opening of presents Christmas morning with your family before the hundreds of guest come over to the house for celebrating the holidays! Also getting free stuff really can’t be beat besides maybe the food!” – Jared Howelton, Young Charles Dickens cast member

What’s your favorite holiday tradition? Tell us in the comments or use #NYCCTHolidays

Ballerina Swan and the Nutcracker

Meet the Cast of Ballerina Swan and the Nutcracker

Sophie the Swan’s new dance adventure, Ballerina Swan and the Nutcracker, continues performances at Theatre Row this weekend. We’re so grateful to have such a brilliant team of dancers bringing Sophie and her friends to life – click their picture to learn more about them!

Abbey Ashley

Abbey Ashley

Sally
Jeff Davis

Jeff Davis

Peter
Valerie Guido

Valerie Guido

Amaker Smith

Amaker Smith

Sir Nutcracker
Emily Vetsch

Emily Vetsch

Sophie

 


Join Sophie the Swan on a brand new dance adventure this Winter at Theatre Row!

Break out the tutus and toe-shoes for Sophie the Swan’s latest adventure. A companion piece to the hit Ballerina Swan, this world premiere blends ballet and puppetry as Sophie prepares for her first holiday performance of “The Nutcracker.” Based on the book Ballerina Swan by Allegra Kent and illustrated by Emily Arnold McCully.


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Young Charles Dickens

Meet the Cast of Young Charles Dickens

New York City Children’s Theater’s modern holiday classic, Young Charles Dickens, returns to Theatre Row in December! We’re so excited to introduce the incredibly talented cast – click their picture to learn more about them!

Elaine Cotter

Elaine Cotter

Elizabeth Dickens, et. al.
Kyle Huey

Kyle Huey

Mr. Dickens, Squeers, et. al.
Jared Howelton

Jared Howelton

Tommy Traddles, Jo, et. al.
Cameron Mullin

Cameron Mullin

Bob Fagin
Nick Sacks

Nick Sacks

Charles Dickens

 


The modern holiday classic returns this winter at Theatre Row!

Before he became a famous writer, Charles Dickens was a typical 12-year-old boy with a gift for telling stories. Based on the book A Boy Called Dickens by Deborah Hopkinson, Young Charles Dickens is the true story of how one of the most famous writers of all time found his calling.


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Young Charles Dickens

#NYCCTReads Charles Dickens: David Copperfield

Reading with kids is not only fun, it’s important! According to a study by the National Commission on Reading, “the single most significant factor influencing a child’s early education success is being read to at home prior to beginning school.”

David Copperfield  is the story of a young man’s adventures on his journey from an unhappy and impoverished childhood to the discovery of his vocation as a successful author.

“My meaning simply is, that whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do well; that whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself to completely; that in great aims and in small, I have always been thoroughly in earnest.” – David Copperfield

This is Charles Dickens’s eighth novel.  The novel was first published in 19 monthly installments from 1849-1850 before being published as a book in 1850. This book was Charles Dickens’s favorite of his own work, writing “like many fond parents, I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child. And his name is David Copperfield.” The full name of the novel is The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (Which He Never Meant to Publish on Any Account).

The song If You Please in Young Charles Dickens features David Copperfield and his aunt Betsy!

We highly recommend checking out this book. After you read it, download the #NYCCTReads Activity Sheet and talk about the book together!

Source for information about the above book!


The modern holiday classic returns this winter at Theatre Row!

Before he became a famous writer, Charles Dickens was a typical 12-year-old boy with a gift for telling stories. Based on the book A Boy Called Dickens by Deborah Hopkinson, Young Charles Dickens is the true story of how one of the most famous writers of all time found his calling.


See the Show

Learn About NYCCT’s

Read More

New York City Children's Theater's 20th Anniversary Season

We’re proud to serve all of New York City’s children, and always will be.

Since its founding 20 years ago, New York City Children’s Theater has been committed to promoting diversity. We’ve celebrated kids and cultures from all over the world, and have been fortunate enough to work with a group of artists who come from a variety of ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Teaching city kids that their stories belong on stage, no matter who they are, is a crucial part of our mission.

The recent spike in hate crimes across the country has angered and upset us. Stories about attacks in our city cut especially deep. But we know that there’s power in coming together as a diverse, inclusive community. We promise to keep working to bridge the gaps that divide us: to give underrepresented groups a voice on our mainstage, to cultivate respect and empathy in schools through our anti-bullying workshops, and to encourage collaboration and creativity through our Literature at Play residencies.

We’re proud to serve all of New York City’s children, and always will be.

Ballerina Swan and the Nutcracker

10 of the Most Famous Ballerinas in the World!

Today we take a look back at some other young girls & boys whose dedication led them to becoming some of the most famous ballerinas in the world!

Young Charles Dickens

8 Words You Didn’t Know Charles Dickens Invented

We all know Charles Dickens is one of the most famous writers of all time – but did you know he also invented some of the words he used to write his classic novels? That’s right! He invented words – how cool is that?

Here’s a list of just some of the words Dickens invented (or was an early adopter of). Once you’ve read through them download our free activity sheet to have some more fun with Dickens words!

Bah Humbug:  An exclamation of irritation or disgust. First appeared in A Christmas Carol (1843).

“Bah,” said Scrooge, “Humbug.”

―  A Christmas Carol

Boredom: The state of feeling disinterested. First appeared in Bleak House (1852).

Devil-may-care: reckless; careless or jovial and rakish in manner; seems to come from the saying, “The devil may care but I don’t.”

 “Not that this would have worried him much, anyway — he was a mighty free and easy, roving, devil-may-care sort of person, was my uncle, gentlemen.

– The Pickwick Papers

Doormat: Used metaphorically, a person who is treated poorly. First appears in Great Expectations (1861)

Creeps, the: a feeling of fear and revulsion.

 “She was constantly complaining of the cold, and of its occasioning a visitation in her back which she called ‘the creeps’.”

—  David Copperfield

Abuzz: characterized by excessive gossip or activity.

Rampage: Destructive or violent behavior by person or group. First appeared in Great Expectations (1860).

Flummox: to confuse; perplex.

“And my ‘pinion is, Sammy, that if your governor don’t prove a alleybi, he’ll be what the Italians call reg’larly flummoxed, and that’s all about it.”

The Pickwick Papers


The modern holiday classic returns this winter at Theatre Row!

Before he became a famous writer, Charles Dickens was a typical 12-year-old boy with a gift for telling stories. Based on the book A Boy Called Dickens by Deborah Hopkinson, Young Charles Dickens is the true story of how one of the most famous writers of all time found his calling.


See the Show

Learn About NYCCT’s

Read More