When our teaching artists went to perform FIVE at a NYC school last year, they thought Piper would be the only one learning a new sense that day. After the class, they learned they were wrong… 

During our performance of FIVE, a set of twin girls were particularly taken with the show, excitedly following Piper through every adventure with a keen curiosity.  At the same time, throughout the performance they would need to take breaks and wander in the back of the room with a caretaker until they were ready to rejoin the show.

Following the performance their teacher approached Keila and me and thanked us for a wonderful show, specifically for these two girls.  She said that both twins had received cochlear implants in the past week and were now observing the world in a whole new way.

It was a beautiful reminder that we all experience the world in different ways, and therefore our teaching should reflect that diversity.

They were both mesmerized by Piper and the accompanying activities.  She explained that if they stepped away from the performance it wasn’t for lack of enjoyment, rather they were at times overwhelmed by stimulation as they navigated this new sense.

After learning about the a girls’ cochlear implants, I was moved by the knowledge that these twins were truly learning their senses along with Piper.  It was a beautiful reminder that we all experience the world in different ways, and therefore our teaching should reflect that diversity.  For me, this performance reaffirmed the power of FIVE to bring hands-on, inclusive learning and arts opportunities to children who are differently abled and in need of it most.  FIVE offered these girls an opportunity to learn in a patient environment, full of joy, and sensitive of their needs.

Bring FIVE to your school!