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Dear Albert Einstein

Dear Albert Einstein strikes the right balance between seriousness and fun – The NY Times

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Dear Albert Einstein strikes the right balance between seriousness  and fun

The danger in sacrificing your ideals for popularity isn’t a new theme, but the musical’s authors, Russ Kaplan and Sara Wordsworth, make it feel fresh.

Dear Albert Einstein, a witty new musical for young audiences from New York City Children’s Theater

The young adult actors deserve praise, as does Mr. Kaplan’s rich score, which ranges from ’50s-style rock and jazz to a lilting waltz.

— Laurel Graeber, The New York Times on Dear Albert Einstein

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Dear Albert Einstein

The Message Hit Home for my Daughter!

“I bought my 11-year-old and 10-year-old son to see Dear Albert Einstein this past weekend. I truly enjoyed every minute of it. Besides musically engaging, the libretto was immensely clever. My son was intrigued with Einstein’s life and went home to research him. I think that the message – don’t abandon your interests and skills just because they are ‘unpopular’ – hit home for my daughter. So thank you and the staff of NYCCT for bringing this to life.”

— Dear Albert Einstein Audience Member

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Dear Albert Einstein

The performance was funny & relayed an important message: “Be Yourself”! – Thirty Mommy

We were excited to see the show and it was a great one!

The performance was funny & relayed an important message: “Be Yourself”!

The show was entertaining and the little ones loved it!

—Scherrie Donaldson, Thirty Mommy on Dear Albert Einstein

More About Dear Albert Einstein

Set in 1954, Dear Albert Einstein tells the story of Susan, a 12-year-old star math student who, when starting junior high, struggles between the desire to be herself and the pressure to be like all of the other girls in her class. Her admiration for Einstein, who periodically pops up in her imagination, complicates and eventually helps her along her journey. Combines early rock-n-roll, swing, and classical music.

Book, Music and Lyrics by Sara Wordsworth and Russ Kaplan
Directed by Josh Penzell

Featuring: Sarah Lasko, Michael Lorz, Evan Teich, Lindsay Bayer, Angela Travino


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Dear Albert Einstein

Mommy Poppins reviews ‘inventive and creative’ Dear Albert Einstein

[Dear Albert Einstein] encourages kids, especially girls, to get into math and science without being heavy-handed about it

…it’s a wonderfully inventive and creative show about being yourself

This isn’t your average children’s show–my daughter and I laughed out loud many times

—Raven Snook, Mommy Poppins on Dear Albert Einstein

More About Dear Albert Einstein

Set in 1954, Dear Albert Einstein tells the story of Susan, a 12-year-old star math student who, when starting junior high, struggles between the desire to be herself and the pressure to be like all of the other girls in her class. Her admiration for Einstein, who periodically pops up in her imagination, complicates and eventually helps her along her journey. Combines early rock-n-roll, swing, and classical music.

Book, Music and Lyrics by Sara Wordsworth and Russ Kaplan. Directed by Josh Penzell.

Featuring Sarah Lasko, Michael Lorz, Evan Teich, Lindsay Bayer and Angela Travino,


Read the full review

Don’t miss our

 

 

 

Dear Albert Einstein

Nicole on DEAR ALBERT EINSTEIN and Her Own School Experiences

I recently had the chance to read through Russ Kaplan and Sara Wordsworth’s excellent Dear Albert Einstein script. I loved the story and flew through the pages. Then I immediately found myself recollecting my own school memories and relating to Susan.

Dear Albert Einstein tells Susan’s story. She is a 12-year-old math ‘nerd’ who upon entering middle school decides she wants to leave that behind in favor of trying to fit in with the popular girls. Luckily, she conjures up her idol, Albert Einstein, in her imagination and he helps her find her way. What follows is a touching, smart and funny story of self-discovery.

10 years ago I was a high school introvert, wanting to go about my days without being noticed while also wanting to make friends and have the social life I thought high school students should have – a major conundrum. It struck me while reading Mr. Kaplan and Ms. Wordsworth’s words, how after all the time that has passed, I still found myself relating to Susan’s journey.

There is so much pressure to look and act a certain way, especially by your peers and especially in that middle-to-high school age bracket, which is why it is so important to have a passion and to nurture it. For Susan it’s math; for me it was days spent in the back of the library writing; creating characters and worlds that were all my own. And it was my love of writing that allowed me to stay true to myself, not concern myself with what others thought and eventually did find me those friends I thought I should have.

Like Susan, we all leave school having gone on a journey that ends with a better understanding of self. Although it’s probably more fun to have Einstein pop up when you least expect him!

How did your middle and high school experiences help shape you?

-Nicole